The Latest

10/01/2015
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Montane Spine Race – Day 1

Weather forecasts for the Montane Spine Race left little doubt, this year was going to be a tough and brutal slog.  Over 150 brave souls honoured the 50th year of the Pennine Way, by racing along the 268 and 108 mile non-stop national trail, as part of Britain’s most brutal ultra race. The forecast was for gale force winds, driving rain, sleet, snow and everything in between.  Ultra racers in Britain aren’t put off by a “little” weather and the 108mile Challenger Race began with 60 competitors lining up at the... Read More

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Masters of the Mountains do it Again

UK mountain biking magazine Singletrack recently tested a number of packable lightweight jackets, labelling our Minimus Jacketwith a coveted ‘Recommended’ award. Tested amongst 13 other jackets ranging from those with a simple DWR coating to fully taped, highly waterproof jackets, reviewer Greg May described the Minimus as packing “enough features into its stripped-down alpine jacket form that it’s hard to want for more”. From the length of the arms and jacket to how small the wrist closures adjusted, Greg’s overall verdict was: “A perfect complement to the British winter.  Fully waterproof, packable and... Read More

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North Star Jacket Trail Approved

Trail magazine’s January 2015 issue (available to buy now) has tested our North Star Jacket, awarding it their seal of approval. Trail’s gear expert, Graham Thompson, praised the jacket for its high level of insulation (800+ fill power), weight for performance and water-resistant outer of Freeflow Ultralite. Conclusion: “The level of insulation is great for typical British winters in the hills” Read more about the new men’s and women’s North Star Lite Jackets.

28/06/2011
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CATLIN ARCTIC SURVEY RESEARCH

Initial analysis of the data collected on the Catlin Arctic Survey, supported by Montane, indicates the Arctic Ocean’s unique water column is altering. Data from Catlin Arctic Survey 2011, collected during an eight-week expedition from March to May, indicates the temperature of Arctic seawater below 200 metres depth has decreased by a ‘surprising’ one degree Celsius in comparison with previous observations. This may conversely be accelerating the Arctic sea ice melt, which could have a knock-on effect for the currents that circulate heat and nutrients around the world’s oceans. Survey... Read More